Posts by Mike Baer

You Can’t Do It All

I’m pretty sure that many of us not only think we can do it all but that we must do it all. My guess is that’s why we often go to bed frustrated, guilty, and already behind for tomorrow. Can I set the record straight?  First, you don’t have to do it all.  Second, you…

Read More

Gut Plus Science – Fostering A Fearless Culture

Mike Bear is a guest on the Gut Plus Science podcast discussing strategies to diagnose and treat disease in your companies culture. Hire for attitude and beliefs. Don’t hire based on competency. Skills can be trained. Beliefs—not so much. What attitude are you looking for and what kind of mindset do you need in your people? Are…

Read More

First ‘Who’ Then ‘What’ – Good to Great Revisited

The types of companies that Jim Collins researched for Good to Great were quite large (think Wells Fargo and Kroger) so when he wrote this chapter he was looking at global corporate strategy. His point was to look at your talent and let that drive your direction. His specific points were to make sure you…

Read More

A Culture of Discipline – Good to Great Revisited

Once the “one thing” (Hedgehog Principle) is discovered, according to Collins’ research, the good-to-great companies became almost fanatical in their discipline to remain focused on it compared to the also-rans who flitted from one thing to another and turned innovation into a fetish. Squirrel! Shiny object! Collins contrasts the three types of organizations he discovered.…

Read More

The Hedgehog Principle – Good to Great Revisited

Great leaders don’t just motivate and inspire; they also bring focus and clear direction. The great companies are no different; they are focused and know exactly what they should be doing and, consequently, avoid wasting energy, money and talent on things that are not core to their business. In the famous scene from City Slickers,…

Read More

Level 5 Leadership – Good to Great Revisited

One of the surprising things that Jim Collins and team found when they were isolating what great companies had in common was leadership. Of course it wasn’t having leadership that was surprising but the kind of leadership they had. In Collins’ words, it was “level 5 leadership.” You can see from this diagram that no…

Read More